Posts Tagged ‘Susan Guarneri’

Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Networking Online and Your Personal Brand – Part 1

Thursday, September 5th, 2013
Susan Guarneri_0634Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri
Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Networking Online and Your Personal Brand – Part 1

Social media networking has gained ever-increasing importance for job search and career success. For example, the Jobvite 2012 Social Recruiting Survey (July 2012) revealed that 92% of employers in 2012 used social media networks in recruiting, with LinkedIn topping the list of most-used sites.

In addition, the Jobvite 2012 survey indicated that one out of every seven people referred by someone in their networks had been hired. In contrast, only 1 out of 100 candidates who were not referred had been hired. Those are impressive statistics that support the use of online networking in your job search.

So how does social networking intersect with personal branding?

  • Profiles. Each of the top social networking sites, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram, require that you create a user profile. What clear statement (your personal brand value proposition) do you want to convey about yourself in those profiles? What will distinguish you from other similarly well-qualified candidates?
  • Messages. Whether composing a post or tweet, re-tweeting, or re-pinning an image or an infographic that you find online, you are establishing and nurturing your personal brand statement within your public and social networks. Are your messages consistent and relevant to your job search goals? Or are you spinning off in multiple directions at once?
  • Multi-media. More employers than ever before are using social media as a key recruitment tactic. Images and videos, distributed via your social networks, can be powerful tools in terms of attracting and keeping the interest of employers and recruiters. How can you distinguish yourself from other similarly qualified job candidates to be memorable? Are your multi-media consistent with your personal brand?
  • Connections. Building your social networks requires more than simply connecting to people you already know (first-level connections). Look beyond those folks to the people they have in their networks (second-level connections), as well as third-level connections. Who do you need to establish relationships with – in what industries, companies, and organizations – in order to get the referrals you need for your jobs of choice? What will those connections imply about your personal brand?
  • Frequency. Sporadic social networking efforts will not keep you on employers’ and recruiters’ radar screens. Gaining and keeping high visibility for your personal brand requires a strategy of frequent social media activity. It really can be done in as little as 9 minutes a day! When will you create your social networking plan? What will you do to hold yourself accountable to that plan?

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your DREAM Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Top 10 Tips for a Branded Cover Letter – Part 2

Thursday, July 11th, 2013
Susan Guarneri_0634Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri
Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Top 10 Tips for a Branded Cover Letter – Part 2

Cover letters may seem passé in this era of social job search. But a succinct branded cover letter can be the turning point in getting noticed, gaining credibility, and producing a ‘halo effect’ of likeability in a saturated job market.

The unvarnished truth – and many recruiters and hiring managers would agree – is that cover letters tend to be ho-hum and forgettable. So, how can you write a memorable branded cover letter?

Top 10 Tips for a Branded Cover Letter – Part 1 addressed how to write the critical first paragraph and get Audacious Attention. Appealing to the hiring company’s needs and wants (some of them unstated but definable via online research and social networking), rather than talking about what you want, is a surefire way to get noticed.

Branded Benefits

The second paragraph of a branded cover letter must address the baseline concerns of the employer: will you be an asset to company and will you fit in with the team and company culture?

1. Brand Qualifications – address the requirements for a specific job posting using bullet points or a numbered list. Show how your unique qualifications are a match for each requirement. This is the minimum hurdle to get considered.

2. Brand Accomplishments – go beyond the minimum by including quantified accomplishments that tie in to each requirement for the job. Just claiming a skill or XX years of experience is not proof that you would be an asset. Results matter!

3. Brand Style – describe briefly how you attained your accomplishments. What was the signature leadership style you employed? Demonstrate how your approach to getting results dovetails nicely with the company’s values and culture.

4. Brand Add – on Value – tip the scale in your favor with added benefits that exceed stated expectations. Perhaps you have expertise in a second language or additional technical skills. How could that be of benefit in this job?

Confident Close

A wimpy closing paragraph typically goes something like this: I am looking forward to hearing from you. This conjures images of you waiting passively for a phone call or an email. Not too compelling, is it? How about this instead?

5. Brand ROI – summarize the overall impact of your Branded Benefits. This translates into a ROI that employers will recognize and value. Then close with a confident sign-off: ‘Eager to join your team!’

Write a brief one-page cover letter that showcases your top-line brand value that is relevant to the job you are seeking. Make it easy for the employer to see that you would excel in that role and that you would seamlessly mesh with their culture.

Does that mean you have to do some research and take some time to customize your branded cover letters? Of course! Generic cover letters are exactly that – generic, like a commodity. Instead, you have unique brand value, so why waste your time attempting to be generic?

Polish your branded cover letters, using one or more of the tips mentioned in Part 1 and Part 2 of this Top 10 Tips article. You will find it to be an invaluable return-on-investment for your time!

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your DREAM Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Top 10 Tips for a Branded Cover Letter – Part 1

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Susan Guarneri_0634Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri
Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Top 10 Tips for a Branded Cover Letter – Part 1

With the proliferation of automated online applications by employers, cover letters are mainly read AFTER your branded resume successfully navigates the automated screening in an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). The exceptions: when you include a branded cover letter in body of the email message sent directly to a hiring manager or recruiter, or when an employer is screening resumes and cover letters manually.

Of course, producing a top-notch, branded resume (discussed in Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 1 and Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 2) is the first, and most critical step.

But cover letters can be pivotal…especially if you integrate your personal branding into your targeted cover letters, just as you did with your branded resume. It’s true, sometimes cover letters are not read at all. But when they are read, either upfront in the selection process or after your branded resume gets you the nod for further scrutiny, they become exceedingly important. Why? Because unlike your resume, you can expand on Why, What, and How:

  • Why you are a great match with the job opening and company,
  • What you have to offer of value (your Brand ROI), and
  • How you obtain your results that aligns with the company and team cultures.

Format your cover letter in three brief, simple sections (paragraphs and/or bulleted lists). Each section has a theme: Audacious Attention, Branded Benefits, and Confident Close. Let’s start with the first section. The final two sections will be addressed in Part 2 of this article series.

Audacious Attention

Grab their eyeballs with one or more these tactics in the first section:

  1. Brand Image – visual appeal via branded logo / header, tagline, fonts, and brand color that matches the look and feel of your branded resume.
  2. Brand ROI – overall impact of your past accomplishments and proven future ROI that meets – and exceeds – the needs of the job and the company’s goals.
  3. Brand Values – synchronicity of your values with the company’s stated mission and values in action; research and cite specific examples of alignment.
  4. Brand Network – mention of company employees or customers within your social network, including those who would refer you for the job and why they feel you would be a great hire.
  5. Brand Uniqueness – how you are different from your typical competitors in this job function or industry and why that makes you an exceptional candidate for this specific position.

Stay tuned for Part 2 next month!

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your DREAM Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 2

Thursday, March 7th, 2013
Susan Guarneri_0634Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri
Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 2

One of the most effective strategies to ensure your resume will gain positive traction and generate an interview is a Stand-Out Branded Resume. Part 1 of this 2-part branded resume series explored 5 ways to begin your resume make-over.

Here are the 5 remaining tips to give your resume that added professional polish and branding pizzaz:

  • Relevant Keywords
  • Keywords are essential to your resume being ‘found’ by resume-screening software in an ATS database. They also telegraph to an employer that you have a Career Focus (job function + industry) that is well-suited to you and your brand strengths. Finding relevant keywords is easy. But how to use those keywords properly in your resume is another matter entirely. Above all, do not keyword-stuff your resume!

  • Power-packed Accomplishments
  • Your job duties and responsibilities are not accomplishments. Accomplishments are the end result of those job duties. Branded accomplishments demonstrate HOW you got those results because of WHO you are (top brand attributes) and WHAT you do (top skills and strengths). Be sure to include quantifiers ($, %, numbers) for added power. For example: Increased productivity of junior engineers by 55% in one year by focusing on team cohesiveness and shared learning in a fun, client-committed environment.

  • Big-Picture Value
  • What is your brand’s big promise of value? Review your accomplishments over the past 10 years and look for themes. Was cost-cutting and doing more with less (lean resources) your claim to fame? Or was it creating gold-standard customer experiences that grew client retention and repeat business to record levels? What is that ONE thing that is your Value-Added tipping point?

  • Over-the-top Extras
  • These are the ‘icing-on-the-cake’ extras that embody your personal brand and score big because of the added impact they make. Be sure they are relevant to the job function, industry, and company. For example, if you are applying to a global company renowned as a pioneer in the financial-services technology industry, you may want to emphasize your multi-cultural experience, international internships, proficiency in languages, early adoption of technology in your previous jobs, and leadership in international groups on LinkedIn.

  • Branded Appearance
  • Human beings respond to visual stimuli; consequently, your branded resume needs to have visual appeal. One element of visual appeal is your brand color. Use color on your resume either generously or sparingly depending on the industry and company. But use it! Also consider font types, resume layouts, interactive features, and even methods of delivery that are in sync with your brand. For example: view these 10 digital resumes that went viral!

Your resume is marketing You, Inc. It must prompt your target audience to immediately want to pick up the phone and arrange an interview with you. Anything less is a ho-hum moment for hiring managers and recruiters who read hundreds of resumes daily.

Will you take the Stand-Out Branded Resume challenge and revamp your resume? If your current resume is not working for you, what have you got to lose?

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your DREAM Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 1

Thursday, January 10th, 2013
Susan Guarneri_0634Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Top 10 Tips for a Branded Resume – Part 1

What needs to change in the New Year? Perhaps it’s your resume. Is it mundane and boring or does it attract attention from hiring managers and recruiters? One of the keys to getting noticed in this job market saturated with well-qualified applicants is a Stand-out Branded Resume.

Here are the first five tips (Part 1) of a two-part series on how you can incorporate personal branding into your resume:

1. Targeted On-Brand Headline

Are the types of jobs you seek aligned with your top brand attributes, skills, and strengths? Your Stand-Out Branded Resume must clearly demonstrate that you are targeting a specific type of position that is well-suited to you. A generic resume with no target or an ambiguous one, such as ‘Management’, puts you at risk of being perceived as a commodity. Instead, include a Targeted Headline such as ‘Social Media Communications Manager – Consumer Goods’ or ‘Sales Manager – Pharmaceuticals’.

2. WIFM Tagline

What’s-in-it-for-me (WIFM) relates to what the employer wants – value! Showcase your personal brand value with a concise, compelling tagline positioned directly below your Targeted On-Brand Headline. Here’s an example:

  • (HEADLINE) Operations Director – Transportation and Logistics
  • (TAGLINE) Champion of Cost Cutting Without Sacrificing Quality

3. Branded Summary

The Summary at the beginning of your resume is much like the preview of coming attractions at the movies. In addition to an overview of your qualifications that match the requirements for the position, it must also immediately excite interest. Your personal branding points of differentiation and brand value signal that you are a top-pick applicant. Go beyond the minimum and entice the employer with your value-added extras that are like the icing on the cake!

4. Social Media Know-how

Showcase that you are social media savvy and connected to others in your profession and industry by including links to your LinkedIn Profile and Twitter account in your contact information. Of course, your profiles need to highlight your personal brand and be up-to-date and complete. Don’t send employers to a social media profile that is sparse or perfunctory. Spice it up with even more compelling information beyond what your limited one- or two-page resume can convey.

5. Up-to-date Education and Training

Employers do not hire applicants with old knowledge and training. Determine the most desirable certifications, licenses, and/or training for your targeted, on-brand career and obtain at least one of them. Then keep doing that every year. A Stand-Out Branded Resume must show you are a top-quality applicant in every respect. This overwhelming evidence of your commitment to your career field absolutely differentiates you from your competition.

The 360Reach tool enables you to discover and distill your authentic personal brand via honest feedback from people you select who know you well. That needs to be your first step in creating your Stand-Out Branded Resume for the New Year.

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your DREAM Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Road Test Your Career Choices – Get the Feel for the Road

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Road Test Your Career Choices – Get the Feel for the Road

Dipping your toe in the water by actually trying out a new occupation before you make a final commitment is a wise career strategy. While you may have done intensive career research, networking, and information interviewing, nothing substitutes for doing the real thing! You may find, for example, that the job on the top of your short list requires you to be available by pager 24/7 (which you had not known), and this is a deal-breaker for you. The following methods are all recommended for road testing a new career:

1. Job Shadowing

This involves accompanying and observing someone who is doing the job you are considering. You may even be allowed to participate in job activities. In some career fields, such as Sales, this is called a “ride-along”. You can arrange job shadowing through your network or you may want to try VocationVacation.com. From Actor to Yoga Studio Owner, Meteorologist to Wilderness Adventure Guide and many more, VocationVacation allows you to test-drive your possible dream job via on-site mentorships or video conferences.

2. Volunteering

Volunteering opportunities are relatively low-risk for employers and high-value if you want real-world experience in potential career fields and industries. Try volunteermatch.org, volunteeringinamerica.gov or govoluntr.com to generate possibilities to explore.

3. Internships

Actually doing the job in a paid or non-paid internship is ideal because you will get to experience the pros and cons of the career field and industry. Better yet, a high percentage (50% plus) of interns are offered permanent jobs after their on-the-job training in internships! Useful resources for internships include Internships.com, Internshipprograms.com, summerinternships.com, goabroad.com for internships abroad, Idealist.org for non-profit internships, and usajobs.gov/studentsandgrads for government internships.

4. Mentorships

Developing personal relationships with professionals for career advice, career development, and contacts is central to mentorships. Any of the five methods listed above (networking, information interviewing, job shadowing, volunteering, and internships) can be sources for mentors. While many people are ready and willing to be mentors, they are often not asked. Perhaps you may not know how to go about approaching a possible mentor or wonder what you can expect from that relationship. The Forbes article, How to Start a Mentorship Relationship may be just want you need to get rolling!

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your Dream Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Career Research: Road Test Your Career Choices – The Inside Track

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Road Test Your Career Choices – The Inside Track

Career assessments, career coaching, and career research sites, such as the O*NET Online, can be essential in the initial phases of your career exploration. But, when you narrow down your choices to two or three viable options, you likely will want more in-depth information before you road-test any careers. Here are some resources for you to use:


1. Networking

Top social media sites (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Google+) all have a search box where you can input your top-pick careers or industries. This will yield people with whom you can connect for insider information about occupational careers, industries, and companies.

Meeteor.com dubs itself your “Networking Assistant” on Facebook and LinkedIn. You can search for types of job roles, as well as industries and companies. It produces a weekly list of new connections for you to network with and “dig-deep”.

Vault.com and Glassdoor.com are also credible sources of information about companies and industries via comments from employees and former employees. You can search for these people in your social media networks to go more in-depth about their observations.

Cachinko.com, a Facebook app, identifies additional jobs you might like and “Friends Who Can Help” after you initially select a few occupational roles to explore.


2. Information Interviewing

Asking specific questions about careers, industries, and companies is at the heart of information interviewing. What are your most important work values and needs? Will the occupational role you are considering enable you to meet those? Does the company culture sync up with your values, goals, and personality type?

Beyond these example questions, you will also want to get referrals to many others for additional advice and information. Never base your decision about a career, industry, or company on the feedback of just one person!

In addition to the social media sites listed above, explore PivotPlanet.com, Google+ Hangouts, and Google+ Hangouts on Air (HOA) for access to professionals in a vast array of occupations and industries.

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your Dream Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Career Research: Tips to Avoid Being Overwhelmed

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Career Research: Tips to Avoid Being Overwhelmed

Researching careers and industries has never been easier…or more difficult! Internet searches and social media networking can yield vast amounts of information, and that is part of the problem. Career research can be downright overwhelming.

So how can you make it more manageable? The following questions and suggestions may help you to develop a focused career-research plan:

  1. Why are you doing research on occupations and industries? If your answer is somewhat vague, as in “I want a different career”, then your search has no specific target and you are apt to be wandering aimlessly online.
  2. What questions do you have about specific occupations and industries? Generate a list and then prioritize it to tackle the most important questions first. You will likely find that the list will grow and change as you acquire and analyze your research results.
  3. How much time realistically do you have to devote to career research? You cannot create more hours in the day. So fitting in the time to investigate careers online and via social networking means time taken away from other activities. What are you willing to let go of temporarily to do your research?
  4. Do you have a career-research plan? Your plan could include your preferred research methods online and offline, a weekly schedule of designated research time and networking events, and who else can assist you in accomplishing your research goals.
  5. How will you evaluate the validity of the information you find? Remember, not all information found online or via networking is equally trustworthy.
  6. How will you organize the information you find? Using an information-management system, such as Excel spreadsheets or JibberJobber, allows you to store all the information you find in a searchable system.
  7. When will you know that you gathered enough information to make a decision? Unending research can sometimes be an excuse/reason not to make a decision. Or, perhaps you feel panicked to make a decision quickly, and thus do very little research. Either way, you may need to consult with a career counselor or career coach to avoid these pitfalls.
  8. When is your energy level at its best for social networking? We all have differing biological rhythms that influence our activities. Networking requires more upbeat energy, while online research can occur during more quiet periods.
  9. Are you relying on only one source of research information or only one research method, such as Internet research? If so, you may be overlooking valuable input that could ultimately impact your final decision.
  10. What are your top research sites online? You will want to bookmark your favorites to re-visit them as their information is updated. Here are 10 of my top picks:

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your Dream Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Career Likes and Dislikes

Friday, June 15th, 2012
Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Career Likes and Dislikes

What is it you really want in a job? When you are frustrated/bored/angry with your job, the impulse to job search and take the first job that comes along is very tempting. But, as the saying goes, you may be “jumping from the frying pan into the fire”!

Evaluating what you have liked and disliked in your previous jobs is an obvious place to start. Be honest in your assessment. Then look to see if there are patterns in your responses. For example, you may abhor being micro-managed, and yet find that was a common thread in every job you have held.

This is a huge insight! It means you need to do more research about the company and team you are thinking of joining. Ask relevant interview questions about the degree of independence you will have in your job function. Look for indications (proof) that the responses you are getting from hiring managers and recruiters are accurate.

One way to do that is to get feedback from others who have been supervised by your potential manager or supervisor. It’s not all that difficult anymore. We used to get these meaty tidbits about the team and company culture by spending time at the water cooler.

Now we can reach out to folks we do not yet know via social media. For example, using LinkedIn to search companies, employees, and former employees can yield critical information that you would not find published anywhere!

To aid you in assessing your career likes and dislikes in your previous jobs, consider these elements:

  1. Motivated skills – These are the skills you are good at (perhaps even expert at!) that you really enjoy doing. Burnout skills, on the other hand, are those you are good at that you really dislike doing. Consider your current job function. What percentage of your time do you spend doing your motivated skills, and what percentage doing your burnout skills? If you are swamped with daily tasks involving your burnout skills, then it may not be surprising that you dislike your job.
  2. Interests / passions – Do you find your job interesting enough that you are excited to go to work? If not, how could you make it more interesting? What would constitute interesting industries for you to explore? One place to research industries is at the Bureau of Labor Statistics Career Guide to Industries (http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/home.htm).
  3. Values – What are your personal beliefs and top values? Money? Prestige? Competency in your job? Social interaction with your team? Recognition? Advancement? Influence? Does your current career and company culture sync up with those values? While a good match with your values may not be the reason you do not accept a job offer, it often is the reason you will want to leave a job.
  4. Work Environment – This includes your commute, work location, office space (where you actually do your work), co-workers at all levels, clients/customers, company culture, team culture, and more. What workplace elements are invigorating, inspiring, relaxing, or productive for you? Which ones bother you the most? Sometimes even small things, repeated often enough, evolve into big dislikes on the job.

Establish benchmarks for your ideal job and work environment based on these career likes and dislikes. Prioritize these benchmarks by determining which are non-negotiable for you. The non-negotiable items will be at the top of your list. Become aware and act on your new-found insights when considering your next career move. It might save you from making a potentially disastrous career decision.

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your Dream Job.

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Career REinvention – Dream BIG!: Understanding Your Values

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Career REinvention – Dream BIG!
By Susan Guarneri

Looking for your dream job? Ready to try something new? Helpful tips and tools to move you from one career to another.

Understanding Your Values

1. Your values frame how you perceive yourself and others. They are the standards against which you measure your feelings and behaviors/activities, as well as the behaviors of others.

2. Values are closely tied to your career and life goals. Whether the choice is about a career, leisure activities, or even a spouse, values-based decision-making will more likely lead to a satisfactory outcome.

3. When your values are in conflict with each other, it becomes more difficult to make confident choices. Coping mechanisms, such as procrastination, may arise.

4. Your values are essential for “best-fit career” decision-making. They provide criteria for you to use as benchmarks when evaluating possible career choices.

5. Try to satisfy at least two or three of your most important values when you choose a career or job. However, do not make a career choice only based on values. Other critical components include your motivated skills, interests and passions, personality type, non-negotiable needs, and professional and life goals.

6. Decision-making without consideration of your values is likely to go awry. In fact career dissatisfaction often results from values conflicts in your job function (role) and work environment.

7. When your values are in conflict with your career, work situation, or other people, negative emotions, such as stress, anxiety, frustration, anger, and depression, can abound.

8. Your values tend to remain stable throughout your lifespan. But some values may be more important than others at certain times in your life because of your changing life situations and life roles.

9. There are two kinds of values: intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic values, such as Creativity and Ability Utilization, are inherent in actual activities. Extrinsic values, such as Economic Rewards and Prestige, relate to the outcomes of activities. Most often we possess a mixture of intrinsic and extrinsic values.

10. Top-priority values may be satisfied through one role, such as in your job, or via multiple roles in all aspects of your life. For example, if Economic Rewards, Altruism, and Creativity are your top values, your job may fulfill Economic Rewards, a community service role may satisfy Altruism, and a fiction-writing hobby could provide opportunity for Creativity.

Susan Guarneri, Career Assessment Goddess and Reach Master Branding Strategist, can guide you to your best-fit career options and help you land your Dream Job.

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