Personal Brand Book Reviews: Six Pixels of Separation

Personal Brand Book Reviews
By Paul Copcutt

Wondering if you should read “that” book? A seasoned personal brand strategist offers his in depth reviews.

Six Pixels of Separation – Everyone is Connected. Connect Your Business to Everyone
by Mitch Joel
© 2009 Hatchette Book Group 288 pages.

Six Pixels of Separation by Mitch Joel

Main Focus: Integrating Personal Branding, Social Media, Digital Marketing and Entrepreneurship.

Five Key Take Aways (plus 1 bonus one!)

Six Points of Separation – why get involved online?

  1. Accept it
  2. Everything is ‘with’ NOT ‘instead of’
  3. Don’t be fleeting – build, share and grow
  4. Move toward ‘open’
  5. It’s attitudinal not generational.
  6. Do something now – upload a video to YouTube.

5R Score: 28/35 – On a scale of 1-7

  • Relevance – is it right for personal branding? – 6
  • Resonance does it make sense to the reader? – 6
  • Relation is there a connection for everyone? – 5
  • Remakability – does it stand out, will it get noticed? – 6
  • Real – does the personal brand come through? – 5

Would you pick it up?

Usually for me, there is one book that I read each year that I would say to anyone “It’s a must read” – for 2009 this was THE book. With some books I buy they are hard to pick up again – with Six Pixels of Separation I found it hard to put down – in fact I read it again and still refer to it now! This book is on my list of resources that I expect every client to read and implement as part of their personal branding development.

Relevance:
Mitch Joel of Twist Image has written a book on the importance of online brand building and digital marketing that should appeal to every business owner and marketer, because there are tips, resources and tools that we all can use. But it goes beyond just being for the service professional or entrepreneur, much of what Joel talks about can be easily translated to anyone looking to manage their personal brand in a digital age.
Resonance

Resonance:
What I particularly enjoyed was Joel’s writing style and layout of the book. An ex-journalist can be as much a curse as a blessing, but Mitch has been blogging and podcasting for over 5 years. The content and value that he provides almost daily in those mediums has transferred so well in to the book and he has interspersed this with real life examples of his own learnings (he admits he has not done it all correctly) and also has many insights in to the way that others have built and developed their brands.

Relation:
While this should be applicable to everyone, not everyone believes that online marketing is an important tool. It is important to remember that this is not a replacement to many offline personal brand activities you could be involved in. But for those wavering this might be enough to tip the scale.

Remarkability:
Do not put this book on a ‘one day I will read this’ or buy it and then add to the pile by your bedside. Put all those other books, articles, magazines etc you are reading to one side and invest your time in a book that will shift your thinking, challenge your beliefs and cause you to take action not out of fear of missing out or being too late but out of excitement for the opportunity and the sheer fun of it all.

Real:
To get a real sense of Joel’s own personal brand you would do well to interact with him in other mediums such as listening to his podcasts, the production of which is amazingly prolific, read his blog or see him speak live. You can also listen to William Arruda interview Mitch as part of the Reach Personal Branding Interview Series – click the link here.

His message is loud and clear, “It’s no longer a case of should you get involved. First figure out the why, then about the what.”

Paul Copcutt, Personal Brand Architect, is a sought after speaker and coach who uses real client stories and practical applications to help successful professionals and executives get clear about their uniqueness.

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One Response to “Personal Brand Book Reviews: Six Pixels of Separation”

  1. Wow… Paul… what can I say? Thank you! Very, very kind of you.

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